*This post may contain affiliate links, which means I may receive a small commission, at no cost to you, if you make a purchase through a link!*

Whether you’ve been thinking about teaching yoga online or these shifting times have required you to adapt in order to serve your clients, you might be overwhelmed on getting started.

You have so many options available that it’s easy to get stuck in analysis paralysis, meaning you don’t do anything because you’re uncertain of the next course of action or getting it wrong.

I want to help ease the transition, and since we’re talking video, I recorded my top suggestions for helping you get started teaching yoga online.

๐Ÿ‘‰ Below the video, you’ll find links (most are affiliate) to the products I referenced.

Product Information & Links

Lighting

The number one best thing you can do for recording your yoga videos is lighting. Natural light is the best as demonstrated in the tutorial, but if you want to invest in a light kit (because none of us can control cloudy days), this is what I bought:

Studio FX Photo Studio Kit

This is another Studio FX lighting kit similar to the one I bought with an extra light to place overhead. For the additional $15, it’s worth it.

Sound

If you’re starting out, the built-in microphone on your laptop, tablet, or smartphone will work just fine. Just be aware you may need to speak up or have the volume raised on your device.

When you’re ready to upgrade, or maybe start a podcast, or want to record an video interview, here are the external microphones I’ve used and loved:

Snowflake Microphone

Blue Yeti Microphone

Windscreen for Yeti Microphone

Azden Pro Wireless Transmitter

I mentioned in the video that I hadn’t figured out if (or how) the wireless microphone connected to a laptop or smartphone. After a quick search, I learned this particular external wireless microphone can be used with your smartphone or tablet as long as you have the special plug.

Which after digging around in the box, I found mine.

You’ll wear the device with the microphone and connect the device with the antenna (the receiver) into your laptop, tablet, or smartphone.

video

The last piece of the online video puzzle is the device you use to record. Your smartphone is almost a complete video recording studio in your back pocket. Again, be aware of how much storage your phone has because it will stop recording when it runs out.

I found the following stand with ring kit to hold my smartphone while I’m recording.

UBeezie Ring Light with Stand.

Once you’ve recorded your video to either your computer, smartphone, or tablet, you’re going to want to upload it to a platform that will host or “store” your video and make it so others can view it.

I use YouTube for my vlogs and Vimeo for longer videos or when I need the content protected. On YouTube your video automatically publishes to “public” view (in the tutorial, I said video instead of public) but you can also set the video to unlisted and only people with the special link can view.

You can also upload your videos directly to Facebook. This is my least favorite form because you lose some control/ownership of your videos once they’re posted directly to Facebook.

If you’re want to use your smartphone but you’re worried about storage, you can connect to Facebook and go live. Facebook will record and store the video and others can view it anytime. The only downside here, it’s live.

With these tips and tricks, you can drastically reduce your learning curve and vastly improve the quality of what you put out.

You will make mistakes.

You will feel uncomfortable in the beginning.

You will get better each time you do it.

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